Newsletter – September 12th, 2016

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This week you are getting Yukon Gold potatoes, garlic, red onion, carrots, scarlet turnips, daikon radish, regular radishes, squash, peppers, yellow & red tomatoes and possibly some kale.

1960’s & 70’s: Jerry Sr. was running one of only a very few U-pick farms in Colorado at the time. (His Dad Lester ran the farm stand.) He grew a smaller selection of produce and would put an advertisement in the Classified Ads when something was ready to pick and give them a time frame on how long it would last. He specialized in pickling cucumbers (and the dill to go with it), green beans, watermelon, muskmelon, red beets and tomatoes. Jerry Sr. had folks coming as far as central Nebraska and Wyoming plus all the Coloradoans. Customers really looked forward to the tomatoes, but he was equally known for his pickles. Bushel of pickles (40#) sold for (app.) $5.00 and 25# box of tomatoes sold for $4.00. You could purchase the same thing under the farm stand for $5.00 more. He said many times people would pick upwards of 10 bushels!

Jerry Jr. was in high school and college during this period of time. His grandfather gave him a small piece of ground. Jerry planted tomatoes & sold them as a U-pick item to help pay for his college days at UNC. He also worked at the local feed lot or any other odd job he could pick up every afternoon/evenings and on weekends & holidays. He had long 10-15 hour days either working hard or studying hard in order to graduate debt free; which he did in 1980 with his Bachelor of Administration in Business. He wanted to be a manager of a business, a CEO or someday own his own business until he discovered the unpleasant office politics! After a few years messing with that, he decided being his own boss was going to be the best option for him and decided to go back to the farm. As the saying goes, “You can take the boy off the farm but you can’t take the farm out of the boy!”

It’s where his heart will always be.

Festival: The festival is this Sunday starting at 11am. You must check in as soon as you arrive. We need to know how many people are on the farm! We have a few volunteers, but not enough. If you plan on coming to the festival, don’t be surprised if we ask you to help out with something for a little bit. This will be the smallest festival we’ve had since the 1990’s! As sad as I am about the turnout, I am equally as excited! Jerry and I will be able to sit down and enjoy the festivities instead of running around as mad-men!! If you choose to come to the farm at the last minute, please do not eat a hot dog or hamburger because one will not be ordered for you. We still ask you bring a side dish so that you can enjoy a picnic lunch. Chili roasting will begin immediately and continue until there is nothing left to pick. Please check in at the chili roaster for a bucket and again to have the chili’s put in line for roasting & get a ticket for identification. It will cost $2 per person to have the chili’s roasted. Clean up will begin at 4pm sharp (or earlier if the weather gets weird or if everyone leaves early)! Anyone still around at that time will be asked to help break down tents, tables, etc. and help clean up.

This festival is our gift to you. It’s not cheap, it takes three weeks to prep for it and it is a big deal to us. We want everyone to come to the farm and see where your food comes from, to meet us and see this beautiful place. We do that by tempting you with activities. It is amazing how things have changed through the years. Just in our short 24 years as a CSA we have seen so much change in how food is perceived, grown and eaten. Did you know our CSA half share cost $300 in 1993 and today it is $475? Your share did not go up $15.00 a year, nor $10 but $7.29 a year. Such a small price to pay for such a rewarding benefit! And to thank you for being a member, we transform the farm for one day and have a fantastic festival to celebrate!

Have a great week!
Jerry, Kyle, Sam and Jacquie

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