Category Archives: Recipes

Newsletter – June 27, 2017

Dear Farm Friends,

Our first week was as exciting as ever, but this week is even better! We are so happy to be giving you peas, carrots, squash, kohlrabi, garlic, garlic scapes, onions and lettuce. The scapes are the tops of the garlic. This has become the new favorite of our members! It is extremely versatile. It can be grilled and eaten as a vegetable, minced and added to salads & eggs (like onion) and it’s wonderful chopped up for stir-fries. One member told me the best pesto she ever had was prepared with garlic scapes. Another told me she made green garlic hummus with scapes. Don’t be afraid to experiment with these little buggers! They’re wonderful!!

Kohlrabi is in the cabbage family and can be eaten as such. Its great raw in coleslaw, salads or as chips. I replace watercress in stir fry’s with it and it is wonderful on its own sautéed until tender.

Fruit: You received cherries last week and will get apricots this week. We are working with Rancho Durazno & Ela Family Farms, both are certified organic. Rancho Durazno purchased those bags at a farm sale and was reusing them. I did not realize there was a bar-code number on the bag or would have addressed it in the newsletter!

Bags and Boxes: I forgot to tell you how important it is to return your vegetable bags every week. We reuse them as many times as we can. This includes any small produce bags for beans or peas. (Please take the time to dump or shake out any extra organic material left in the bottom. This way your DC does not have to clean out 30 bags & Jacquie does not have to dump out 600!) Distribution Centers will be keeping track of this, so don’t be surprised if they remind you how often you have forgotten or how many bags you have not returned!

Facebook/Blog/Website/Email: Please be aware that I do not work from these social media sites. Several members took it upon themselves to start these up and continually update them. Everyone needs to contact me directly by phone when making changes to their shares. I will need not only your name, but also your Distribution Center. Email is the same. I know this is very convenient for you, but I am home only a half day on Monday and Friday each week. So it is not the best way to contact me. I am very good about answering phone messages, but I do not have time to look at email. You can use email for anything that does not need to be answered immediately!

Donations: We are now taking nominations for families with health problems and/or financial problems to get a share from the farm. We have around 15 shares available after helping out current farm members. Please call or email your nomination including what their situation is & how to contact them. We will try to get those started no later than the middle of July.

Thank you for a great first week. I know a lot of DC’s were on vacation either the week before or the week of our first delivery and you may have gotten a late notice or had someone doing distribution that was not your Distributor. As the summer goes along, things should even out!

Jacquie, Kyle, Sam and Jerry

Veggie Wash (Especially for store bought produce!)

Juice from a whole lemon
2 Tbsp vinegar
1 cup water
1 spray bottle

Mix and spray onto surface of veggies. Let sit for a minute or two. (Longer if trying to remove wax.) Scrub lightly on soft skinned veggies and more & scrub brush aggressively on hard skinned produce like winter squash, cucumbers, root veggies and melons. Leafy greens simply should be sprayed, sit and rinsed.

Newsletter – September 26th, 2016

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Dear Friends of the farm,

This week you are getting potatoes, yellow onions, carrots, broccoli, purple peppers, basil, yellow & red tomatoes, either butterhead or romaine lettuce and corn (the last picking).  And there is a possibility you will get either cabbage or cauliflower too.  This is a great week for distribution, enjoy!

Fruit:  Sorry folks, I have been lax on telling you what you are getting and from who for the last couple of weeks. Once I really didn’t know and the other time I completely forgot to mention it!  The pluots and peaches were from Rancho Durazno, the red and green pears were from First Fruit and the plums and pears were from Ela Family Farms. You will be getting apples for the rest of the season from Ela Family Farms as well.  This week you will receive Gala apples.

Tomato Picking:  Several of you have been asking about tomato picking and that will not happen this year.  Jerry tells me that the storm destroyed most of the tomatoes.  What was left has been ripening slowly and we have been giving them all to you each week.

Lost & Found:  Lost – when we put the yard games away this year we discovered we are missing two red bean bags and one tennis ball.  I do not plan on replacing these items so if you could check with your kids and return these items to your distributor, we would really appreciate it!  The bean bags were homemade to look like strawberries. Found – I have a plate, several bowls and utensils that were left behind.  I do not mind returning them.  Please call and let me know what you need and where to send it.  Thanks!

T-shirts:  Hurray!  We finally have them, (a little late I know) but they are here!!!  Thank you for supporting the fund that helps pay for the donated shares. Farmers do not get credit on their taxes for donating food.  It is a true donation of the heart and we feel this is an important part of being a farm.  We decided to sell the cookbooks, hats and t-shirts to help fund this instead of making a profit and sticking it in our pockets.  I love the look of these shirts and hope you do too! Enjoy them, wear them proudly knowing they are for a good cause and thank you for your support!

Braised chicken with root vegetables
(page 64 in cookbook )

1 T olive oil
1 bunch of kale
4 med. potatoes
4 cloves garlic, smashed
1 bunch turnips with greens
salt & pepper
2 springs of rosemary
3 large carrots
4-6 chicken pieces (thighs and legs)
2 cups dry white wine

Chop all greens, cube, half or quarter veggies. Cook garlic and rosemary in oil til fragrant.  Add veggies and greens to pot, season with salt & sauté for five min.  Season chicken with salt and pepper & set aside.  Add wine to veggies and reduce by one-third.  Put the chicken on top of the veggies, reduce heat to low, cover tightly with lid and cook until chicken is tender and juices run clear, app. 40 minutes.  Serve with crusty bread.

Newsletter – September 5th, 2016

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Dear Members,

This week you are getting potatoes, white onions, purple carrots, daikon radish, white turnips, eggplant, jalapeno peppers, bell or specialty sweet peppers, cabbage, tomatoes and corn. Fruit share will be getting getting pluots and peaches and anyone who ordered a box of peaches will be getting that, too.

Winter Share and Animals: Thank you for taking the short survey. Here are the results: out of 90 people surveyed; 60% wanted organic squash and 40% said not to purchase anything. 60% said not to purchase any dried beans and 40% said to purchase them. So….Jerry will purchase local, organic squash for November and December and not for January and February. He will not purchase any dried beans at all.

We are looking for a new distribution center (DC) in Boulder. I need someone there to help us unload the truck and be present for distribution. Time window of two hours is required, (preferably late afternoon/evening), but longer hours or hours that suit your CSA customers are fine. We need a garage at least the size of a single car because of cold weather. You get $100 discount for helping out. This is not difficult work, the members are so excited to see you & get their bags of produce and you get to choose your hours. Please call me if you need more info! If we cannot find a DC, you can go to Westminster or Longmont.

Here is the Winter Storage Share Form 2016. I will need this back by the end of September. Please mail to me with your check to pay the deposits. I will be offering shares outside the CSA at this time because pre-ordering occurred this past January/February. Call me if you have any questions, I am still not checking email but once every week or two.

Festival RSVP: This is our 80th Anniversary! Let’s celebrate in style by getting together on a beautiful day in September! Nothing speaks of a party without food. Hamburgers, hotdogs, drinks and your utensils will be provided. Why not boast a little and bring your best side dish.

Please continue to call or email Peg Lehr with your RSVP (wrdwrrior@comcast.net or 303-877-2554). We cannot figure out how much food, plates, forks etc. without these numbers. The festival is Sunday, September 18th from 11 to 4. The deadline is September 9th.

We will have U-pick hot peppers and raspberries (plus a few surprises in the barn). You will not be able to get a full bushel. Peppers will be roasted as full bushels and then divided equally into thirds or (quarters if necessary)! We will have hayrides to the pumpkin patch (Jerry will purchase organic pumpkins for the occasion). We plan on making a display from a 1990 festival with a picture of our family from that time period. You are welcome to have your picture taken with this display and a few murals will have been painted for picture taking as well. Other activities include face painting, corn shucking contest, stick horse races (Please bring your best steed. Prizes will be awarded for races and a grand prize for the best in class!) plus games on the front lawn. We hope to have a new game available where families compete by loading up dad with pumpkins and he tries to carry them to a finish line. The winner gets to keep all the pumpkins he can carry! Canning contest for jams/jellies, savory/sweet relishes and pickles. Let Peg know if you are bringing something to be judged. T-shirts and hats will be available (I hope) to purchase by the festival.

Several members have been so gracious to help with food expenses this year. One member of the farm is having a large sheet cake made to commemorate our 80th anniversary. If you decide to bring a dessert, I would say we only need gluten free. A second member has graciously offered to bring all the hotdogs and buns for the festival. Thank you in advance for your donations.

Mark your calendars to keep this day open. We plan on having a ton of fun!!!

Volunteers needed: The festival cannot run without all the extra hands that day. If you have not volunteered in the past, this is an excellent opportunity to invest some of your time into the farm! We still need Volunteers for the following: the Check-in Station, 4 Master Grillers, people to cut up produce, set up tents, tables and chairs, sevearl to rinse cookware & set under the serving table and resupply cut veggies & to refill drink containers, 4 to check on bathrooms and empty trashcans around the area, 5-6 people to run the canning booth and/or t-shirt booths.

Storm Follow-up: Please visit our Facebook page to stay on top of what is happening on the farm. Sam and Kyle have taken over the page, made it public and are going to post information & pictures as often as possible so you can see firsthand what is happening on the farm.

The farm is looking better these days (and doesn’t smell anymore!). We were impressed with how quickly the Patty Pan squash repaired and started producing again. The zucchini and straight neck squash have also repaired slightly and continued to produce a little. The third and fourth planting of squash wasn’t hurt as badly because the plants were smaller in size and the huge hailstones were far enough apart to not affect them as much. Eggplant is an extremely sturdy plant. Of everything, it didn’t get torn up as much. The hail did knock off most of the flowers though. But soon there were pretty violet flowers all over the plants again. You are getting all that the plant had produced before the storm. Time will tell if we get more later in the season. You are getting tomatoes from the 2nd and third planting. We stager the planting so you get a fresh supply of tomatoes all season. Plus, when there are too many ripening at a time, this gives us a chance to offer u-pick opportunities. We do not know at this time if there will be enough tomatoes to pick by the box this year. We will keep you informed! At lease we have a few for distribution and that is what really counts!! Your bell peppers and specialty sweet peppers were hurt badly and have not really come back at all. The plants look fine, but the peppers were crushed by hail. We are gleaning the fields for every possible pepper we can find. And as I have said before; all our root crops have survived and are looking well for both the summer and winter shares.

Our Insurance Policy: Did you know that we use the farmers markets as insurance for our CSA? We normally go to 9 farmers markets a week. After the storm, we quit all but one. (We estimate we lost 65% of our crop.) I still attend the farmers market in Boulder on Saturdays. We do this for two reasons: 1. Customers are more accepting of the damaged produce and 2. I get more money for my produce at this market.

We discovered a few years ago that we could not cut out all the farmers markets. The reason? We have so much production from Thursday through Sunday (when we don’t pick for members) it has to be picked and used somewhere. You see, we pick every day or the produce would be huge & uneatable. Over time, we discovered when we have a bad year and produce is in short supply, we can cut the farmers markets out and all the produce is saved and given out for distribution. We have had small hailstorms before, but our members very seldom felt the affect. We would lose a crop or two, but most fields could still produce something and be harvested for members.

What can you do to help us? Purchase a Winter Share! We would not survive this storm if we had to depend on farmers markets. But unlike other CSA’s, we put our members first and you always get the best the farm can offer (and all the leftovers from Thursday go to market). Most people walk away from my farmer’s market booth because of the dings, scars and bruises. If it was not for our CSA, we would be lost. Your insurance is the farmer’s markets, but our insurance is the CSA! This is what CSA is about: Support your farmer in the good years and the bad. And when you have an opportunity, support your community too. You can do that by donating your share when you go on vacation or business trips. Unfortunately, you are seeing the results of a very bad storm, but on those good years, (which happen more than not) you will get the bounty and all its glory!

Spicy Roasted Veggies
Serves 8

In a plastic re-sealable bag add:
¼ cup EVOO
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp chili powder
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp garlic salt
½ tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp onion salt
4# root veggies, any kind
Cut all the veggies the same size and place in bag with oil & herbs. Bake on cookie sheet at 400 degrees for 35 minutes. Wonderful cold or hot!

Thank you very much for being so good to us!
Jacquie, Jerry, Kyle and Sam

Newsletter – August 30th, 2016

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This week you are getting Yukon Gold potatoes, yellow onions, carrots, squash, eggplant, sweet peppers, hot peppers (jalapeno) and tomatoes.

Fruit Share Members: You are getting Santa Rosa plums from Ela Family Farms. First Fruit is having a bountiful season. They are offering a 20# box of peaches for $40. If you would like one, please call me no later than Thursday evening. When you call me, make sure you clearly state your name, your distribution center and how many boxes you would like to order. Because everyone has cell phones these days and the reception tends to be tricky out here; it wouldn’t hurt to repeat everything! First Fruit will need to start Friday picking peaches in order to have them here early Tuesday morning. He said I could call him as late as Friday evening with our final total…But anything after that would be difficult to include in the order.

The 1980’s: I would say this was a very exciting decade for the two of us. We married in 1984. I worked at a real estate title company and Jerry was working for the same place (that is where we met), but found out his heart was at the farm. He worked for his dad for the rest of the decade. I helped out after work and on weekends. I really didn’t have much choice in the matter; we lived in Eaton, had one car and Jerry took me to work & picked me up! I went where the car went. There always seemed to be something that didn’t get done by the end of the day and we had to go back to the farm.

Jerry’s grandfather & dad ran a U-pick farm since the mid 1950’s. Folks had the option to purchase crops at the farm stand under the shed or pick their own for a discount. By the 1980’s, people were not canning as much as they used to. They still came by to purchase smaller amounts from the farm stand, but that was slowing down too. Jerry started attending farm meetings about farmers markets. They were the rage back east and in California. Several were starting around the area and we wanted to be involved. Jerry was on the boards of two farmers markets; Ft. Collins (Sunday and Wednesday) and Boulder. We decided to attend three more in Cherry Creek, Cheyenne and Downtown Ft. Collins (on Saturday & a different organization).

This was the beginning of a new era for both small farmers and for customers alike. Farmers markets were way more convenient and there was a pretty good selection of produce. We called ourselves Monroe Homegrown Vegetables back then. Pretty much told our story right in the name. Jerry’s mom and dad ran the farm stand while we went to markets (Jerry’s brother and sisters pitched in too). They were successful, beyond our wildest dreams! But prices were very low because customers expected to get produce cheaper directly from the farmers than from grocery stores. We sold muskmelon 3 for $1.00, tomatoes 5 for $1.00, ¾ of a pound green beans for $1.00 and a 25# box of tomatoes went for $5.00. Everything went for a dollar; it was the most we could get! By the time the 1990’s came around, prices had jumped a little: muskmelon were 2 for a $1.00, tomatoes were 3 for a $1.00, green beans were $2.00 for ¾# and a 25 pound box went for $8 to $10. By the beginning of the 2000’s, prices had risen again: tomatoes were a dollar each, muskmelons were $1 to $3.00 each, green beans were $2.00 to $3.00 for ¾# and a 20 pound box of tomatoes went for $15. (Did you notice the size of the box just got smaller?) Today we get $3.00 a pound for tomatoes, muskmelons are $5.00 each on average, green beans are $4.00 a pound and a 20# box of tomatoes sells for $3 to $35.

Just to sum some things up and explain why we changed over the years: My problem with the farm stand was I had to be there from 7 am until dark, seven days a week. I could never leave the stand or leave the farm. We took over the farm in 1991 (I was not longer working in town by then) and after one year of running the farm stand ourselves, we closed the U-pick farm in 1992. We also decided to change our name since there was an explanation for what we did, “organic”. We became Monroe Organic Farms. We liked and appreciated the farmers markets, but whenever we had a weather related problem, no one seemed to care! They would just go to the next farm booth. We felt there had to be something out there that supported the individual farmer better. Besides, we were attending 14 farmers markets a week by then and they were just about killing us! I could not see how we could continue at that pace for the rest of our lives.

We started our CSA in 1993 (one of three at the time) with 38 members; and most of whom were working members! Back then, working members started the first week of April and finished the last week of October. I’m not exactly sure how we would have run the farm without them. These working members became our “Core-Group”. They were in charge of evaluating the farm shares and giving us their suggestions. The first year, we gave them way too much produce and everyone wanted to get a smaller share (which we did not provide)! I really didn’t know what the average family of four ate on a regular basis because I had just started mine (Alaina was born in 1989 and Kyle in 1991)! We told them we needed them to tell us what would be the perfect amount for the Half Share to feed a family of four with kids between the ages of 5 and 12. The second year, we gave out too little! It took us a total of five years of continual surveying to get the shares where they are today. Even so, we still adjust because so many people’s diets have changed over the years. So, when we do survey you, they are very important to complete!

Decades of Customers: In the last five years, Jerry, Kyle and I have run into people who have said they came to either Lester’s U-pick farm (Jerry’s grandfather) or Jerry Sr. U-pick farm as children. Jerry’s customer, Mary, came on a regular basis to his farmer’s market to purchase anywhere from 5 to 10 boxes of tomatoes a week. She did this for 15 years or more. Mary would buy them for everyone she knew. She spoke of coming to the farm in the 1950’s & 60’s. She passed away five years ago at the age of 90. Kyle ran into a woman this summer at his farmer’s market who said she had visited the farm when she was in her 20’s and knew Jerry Sr. He thought she was around 80 years old. And I had a gentlemen come to me at my market three years ago to inform me he knew the family farm and loved coming with his parents to pick tomatoes. One time, Jerry Sr. gave him his very own watermelon to eat. He said he never forgot that! I think he was in his mid-70’s. I can’t believe we are still running into people that knew the family farm from so many years ago. It warms my heart almost to melting!

Eggplant Dip (page 2 in our CSA cookbook)

1 medium eggplant, peeled & diced
½ tsp pepper
1 or 2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
1 tsp cumin
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 green onions, chopped (or chopped white onion)
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp tahini paste, optional

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spread eggplant and garlic on baking sheet lined with parchment paper and drizzle with oil. Roast until tender, about 20 minutes. Remove skins on garlic and mash together with eggplant. Stir in the rest of the ingredients. (I like to cook the onion too and mash with the eggplant). Serve with crackers or veggies. Other alternatives available in cookbook.

Newsletter – July 19th, 2016

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Dear Farm Friends,

This Week you are getting Yukon Gold potatoes, green beans, white onions, cucumbers, squash, garlic and fennel.  A very exciting development:  the muskmelons are starting to ripen!  We are hoping there will be enough to give each of you one.  Muskmelon and cantaloupe are in the same plant family.  Did you know that all melons originated in Egypt?  Muskmelon is the parent plant to cantaloupe.

Exchange Box:  Each distribution center should have an exchange box.  This allows you to take items out of your bag you really don’t want and pick up something someone else has left behind.  If your DC does not have an exchange box, ask for one!

Mesh bags:  As I have stated before, we are short staffed at the farm because we do not have as many Working Members as normal.  It would help us greatly if each household will make sure their bags are free of debris.  By not taking care of this, you are asking your DC to remove debris from 30 bags.  If they do not do it, then I have to empty out 600 bags.  Many hands make light work.  Please do your part!

Volunteers wanted!  Have you ever wondered how Distribution works?  After discussing this with Jerry in more detail about getting some help on Tue, Wed and Thr; we have decided that if you choose to come help us one morning, you do not need to help in the fields afterword.  We start at 7 am and we fill all the bags, count corn, tomatoes & melons then load trucks.  You can take your veggies home with you that morning.  Please give me a two day advance notice to switch you out of your DC and onto the farm!

T-shirts:  This is the week to turn in your order for t-shirts.  The due date is July 29th.  If you forget to take your T-shirt Order Form to the DC, they will have extra forms for you to fill out.  Or if you prefer, you can call in your order with me and I’ll take care of you.  You have the option to pay at time of order or after being invoiced!

Green Bean and Potato Salad    (page 18 of the CSA Cookbook)

  • 1# cooked, cut green beans
  • 2T. vinegar
  • 4 large potatoes, cubed and boiled
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 med. onions, thinly sliced in half moons
  • ½ t. dried oregano
  • 2T. extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Combine first three ingredients.  Whisk together the next four ingredients.  Toss the veggies with the sauce and season with salt and pepper.  Refrigerate at least four hours; but preferably overnight.

Serves 6 to 8.

(My grandmother used to add bacon to this once in a while!)

Newsletter – July 12th, 2016

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This week you are getting Walla Walla onions, kohlrabi, golden beets, squash, cucumbers, garlic and kale.  Substitute kohlrabi for bamboo shoots in stir-fry’s or eat sliced and sautéed or boiled.  It is a member of the cabbage family so can be added to coleslaw or salads.

Fruit:  You will be getting cherries this week from First Fruits Organic Orchard!!!

The Farm:  Jerry is seeding (planting) corn and beans today.  I bet you didn’t know that in order to get beans and corn every  week, it has to be planted every single week; cucumbers and summer squash are planted every three weeks; your melons and tomatoes are planted three times a year and potatoes, beets and carrots twice a year.  Unfortunately, Mother Nature was grumpy in May and killed the first planting of beans and corn.  But, Jerry is confident you will be getting green beans soon and possible corn by the end of the month!

Cucumber Relish/Salad:

  • 1 C. fresh cooked corn, cut off cob
  • 1 lg. cucumber, chopped
  • 2 T finely chopped onion
  • 2 t. honey
  • ½ t. salt
  • 3 to 4 t. finely chopped cilantro
  • 1 T. red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar
  • 1 T. sesame oil or olive oil
  • 1 t. dried red chili flakes
  • 1 small hot pepper

Mix and refrigerate for several hours to allow flavors to blend.  Serves 8 to 10.

Veggie note: Cut zucchini lengthwise and use in your favorite lasagna recipe instead of pasta noodles.  It is a great way to use up those large zucc’s! Zucchini Boats are a lovely dish as well. Make your favorite stuffing; bread, veggie or meat and place in your zucchini cut lengthwise with the seed bed removed. Bake at 350 degrees for 45min. to an hour. Another way to use up the larger cucumbers is to make tuna boats.  Make tuna salad and place in minced (optional) cucumber, again cut lengthwise with seed bed removed. This is a cool and refreshing meal for lunch or dinner!

Produce Fees/Lamb:  Half of your produce fees, fruit and honey are now due.  This is a reminder to send in your checks no later than the 22nd to avoid late fees.  Jerry was inspecting the sheep this morning and says it looks like they will go to processing sometime in September, maybe August on the biggest ones.  We had asked that all lamb be paid in full by August 1st, but will allow that to extend to the 15th since they are going in later than expected.

T-shirts:  Turn in your order form to your Distribution Center in the next two weeks.  (I’ll have extra forms at the DC’s)  If you prefer; I’ll take the order in house.  Please do not email an order to me!  Either mail it to me or give it to your DC.  It’s no problem to pay for your t-shirt at the time you order or you can be invoiced.  We expect to be paid immediately upon receipt of the invoice.  We will deliver your t-shirts to your DC as soon as they are printed and obtained by us (hopefully no more than three weeks).  What a great way to show your support of a local, 80 year old farm!!!

Something Special:  On the other side, you will find an article written by a 2nd year working member.  Our first year (38 members in 1993), we didn’t write a newsletter until the very last week of the season.  The next year, we wrote a monthly newsletter with members writing many of the articles.  This was one of my favorites!  Our 2nd year we had 78 members and the working members started the 1st of April and worked through October.  We did distribution two days a week on Tue and Thur.  We had five Distribution Centers:  Aurora, Lakewood, Boulder, Ft. Collins and the farm and everyone had to drive to one of these locations.  These members were really dedicated to supporting a local farm!!!

Learning and Working the Farm Experience 

Paula Reets, 2nd year working member (written in 1994, our second year as a CSA)

Being a working member on the farm has been a great learning experience for my family.  We’ve especially learned to appreciate vegetables.  What a difference it makes being directly responsible for the production of your food!  It even seems to taste better. We’ve learned a lot about the farming process, from planting to harvesting.

During planting, we learned that when Jerry says to plant the seedlings a foot apart, that everyone’s foot is a different size.  We learned how delicate the seedlings can be—yet they can withstand the normal range of weather; wind, rain and heat.  We learned how extreme weather can wipe out a whole crop, and how to transplant volunteer tomato plants because the rest of the tomato plants suffered severe wind burn.

We learned how to hoe, which means we learned about weeds.  Some, like the dandelion and lamb’s quarters, are actually edible.

We learned that time passes much more quickly when your busy making friends with other working members.  It can be very peaceful listening to the kids play and the birds sing.  Sometimes, we even hear a goat bleating in the distance.

Hoeing is exhausting, but harvest follows soon after it, and it’s a welcome change.  Yet harvesting often can be harder than hoeing!

We learned things about food that I don’t remember from Biology class.  We discovered that sun warmed, fresh picked strawberries are the tastiest, and the berries with bird bites are the sweetest.  And—what a surprise!—discovered that green beans actually taste good raw.  But most surprising of all, we learned that contrary to popular belief, you can eat the black seeds in watermelon!

The kids learned a couple of interesting animal facts too.  They learned that snakes eat toads live, and that pigs have hair!

Most important of all, we learned that farming is hard work, but, every minute we put in on the farm is worth it.  Not only do we get superior quality produce, we make great new friends too!

Paula Reets has been with our farm since our very first year.  She wrote this for me to help members understand what you get out of being a working member.  Unfortunately, this year we are very short of working members.  If you would like to join us one day to help out, let me know!  You will take your produce home with you that day.  Please give me at least a two day notice!  We start at 7 am sharp and work four hours on Tue, Wed and Thr.  You will start out your day bagging up the produce for the non-working members, then will move on to barn clean-up, field work or prepping produce for market.  This is a great way to see how a small portion of your farm works and what your Working Members are responsible for!!  Families are welcome, so plan on joining us soon!

2006:  I was looking at newsletters to see what the weather was doing ten years ago.  I was talking about the dry weather and how so many farmers’ wells were shut down because they were never augmented.  (You have to own surface water (to put back into the ground) in order to take water from underground because it depletes what is running down rivers when groundwater is too low.  Surface water just sinks underground instead of running on top.)  I hope this makes sense!  Anyway, the shutdown did not affect us because all of our water comes from two reservoirs.  Spring was rough that year because of numerous freezing in late May and early June.  So it looks like our first delivery didn’t start until the fourth week of June!

Until next week….Jacquie and Jerry

Newsletter – July 5th, 2016

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This week you should get red onions, scarlet turnips, carrots, garlic, kohlrabi, squash, cucumbers and iceberg lettuce. Both the greens and the bulb are edible on the kohlrabi. It can be eaten raw, cooked or pickled (easy recipe: use a one for refrigerator pickles and substitute the cucumbers for kohlrabi). To extend storage of the greens, separate from the bulbs and place in a resealable bag. They can be eaten raw or cooked. Cook as any other greens.

There will not be any fruit this week. The growers told me that they have been inundated with rain and they cannot get into the fields to pick. Not only that, but it slows down the ripening process. They anticipate having a nice crop of cherries next week (if the weather holds out)!

I hope to have your first delivery of honey this week, if they are not too behind from the 4th!

T-Shirts: To celebrate our 80th anniversary, we are making t-shirts! Here is the T-shirt Order Form. Please fill it out and return it to your distributor by 19th, 20th and 21st (or call me and I’ll fill out a form in-house). T-shirts will be ordered the following week and hopefully we can deliver them to your distributor by the middle of August.

Harvest Festival: Mark your calendars now so you don’t plan anything on top of this fun filled day! September 18th is our festival and it is our way of thanking you, our members, for supporting us throughout the season. We grill hot dogs and hamburgers and provide the utensils and drinks. All of you bring side dishes and desserts. There is a hayride to the pumpkin patch, games for children, corn shucking contests, a pumpkin carrying contest, u-pick opportunities and self-guided tours.

This has been a tradition since 1993 when we started our first year as a CSA. Only once did we have to cancel the festival completely and that was in 2013 during the floods. We have postponed the festival twice due to very cold, stormy weather in the past. This year looks to be a great year and we plan on celebrating in style! Hope you will join us for our 80th Anniversary and the 24th Annual Harvest Festival!

Cream of Spring Vegetable Soup (page 8 of the Farm Fresh CSA cookbook)

4 T. Butter
4-8 small turnips, chopped
1 small onion, diced
4 carrots, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
4-6 cups vegetable stock
2 heads kohlrabi, peeled & chopped
1 cup half & half

Melt butter in a pot, add onion one minute then add garlic and sauté until aromatic. Add kohlrabi, turnips and carrots and sauté 5 minutes. Add four cups of stock and cook until veggies are tender. Puree soup until smooth adding additional stock until you are happy with the consistency. Return to pot. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Soup can be prepared a few days in advance or can be frozen at this time. Before serving, heat soup and whisk in half & half. Serves up to 6.